Honolulu District Earns Prestigious Army Safety Award

The Honolulu District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, received the prestigious Army Safety and Occupational Health Star Award here June 28, 2024, recognizing the district’s successful implementation of the Corps of Engineers Safety and Occupation Health Management System.

Lt. Gen. James B. Jarrard, Deputy Commanding General for U.S. Army Pacific, presided over the ceremony at the historic Palm Circle, where Lt. Col. Christopher “Ryan” Pevey, Honolulu District commander, received the SOH Star flag from Troy Larson, Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Safety and Occupational Health Manager.

Lt. Col. Christopher “Ryan” Pevey, Honolulu District commander, receives the Safety and Occupational Health Star flag from Troy Larson, Headquarters U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Safety and Occupational Health Manager during a ceremony to present the prestigious Army Safety and Occupational Health Star Award to the Honolulu District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Fort Shafter June 28, 2024. USACE PHOTO BY CORTLAND HENDERSON
Lt. Col. Christopher “Ryan” Pevey, Honolulu District commander, receives the Safety and Occupational Health Star flag from Troy Larson, Headquarters U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Safety and Occupational Health Manager during a ceremony to present the prestigious Army Safety and Occupational Health Star Award to the Honolulu District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Fort Shafter June 28, 2024. USACE PHOTO BY CORTLAND HENDERSON

“Thank you for being here today to acknowledge and celebrate the incredible journey that the Honolulu District has embarked on since 2019 as America’s Engineers of the Pacific,” said Pevey. “The Safety and Occupational Health star is the culmination of hard work, dedication and commitment to a positive culture of safety, which is the key component to any safety program, not just compliance.”

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The CE-SOHMS (also known as ASOHMS) is recognized as a leading safety management system framework within the Department of Defense and other federal agencies.

Lt. Gen. James B. Jarrard, Deputy Commanding General for U.S. Army Pacific, provides comments during a ceremony to present the prestigious Army Safety and Occupational Health Star Award to the Honolulu District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Fort Shafter June 28, 2024. USACE PHOTO BY CORTLAND HENDERSON
Lt. Gen. James B. Jarrard, Deputy Commanding General for U.S. Army Pacific, provides comments during a ceremony to present the prestigious Army Safety and Occupational Health Star Award to the Honolulu District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Fort Shafter June 28, 2024. USACE PHOTO BY CORTLAND HENDERSON

Honolulu District successfully integrated all CE-SOHMS processes by well ahead of the 2028 goal issued to all Army echelons.

“You accomplished this feat four years before targeted completion day for all commands,” said Jarrard. “The timeline is an achievement in itself, but what you’re doing every single day to mitigate the risk is truly an exceptional accomplishment.”

Honolulu District is the first district within the Pacific Ocean Division, and fourth organization in the Army, to achieve this recognition from the Assistant Secretary of the Army.

Department of the Army Fellows Sarah Wetsch, Franca Daenzer, Malia Hines, and Ikumi Utashiro pose for a photo during a ceremony to present the prestigious Army Safety and Occupational Health Star Award to the Honolulu District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Fort Shafter June 28, 2024. They served as ushers during the ceremony while wearing newly issued safety helmets and vests. USACE PHOTO BY CORTLAND HENDERSON
Department of the Army Fellows Sarah Wetsch, Franca Daenzer, Malia Hines, and Ikumi Utashiro pose for a photo during a ceremony to present the prestigious Army Safety and Occupational Health Star Award to the Honolulu District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Fort Shafter June 28, 2024. They served as ushers during the ceremony while wearing newly issued safety helmets and vests. USACE PHOTO BY CORTLAND HENDERSON

“For context, there are over 600 Army Command organizations expected to complete a safety management system,” said Larson. “The recognition demonstrates your choice and commitment to truly put people and ohana first. This team is truly special.”

To achieve Star status the Honolulu District had to demonstrate implementation of the system via a three-stage process that generally follows the Army’s “crawl, walk, run methodology” over the course of 3-5 years.

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“Your actions ensure our people and industry partners go home at the end of each day,” said Col. Christopher Crary, Deputy Commander of USACE’s Pacific Ocean Division. “That is not luck. It’s deliberate action. And so, thank you for that. The results of your efforts speak for themselves. You are truly trailblazers.”

The Honolulu District went above and beyond the requirements to obtain the Star status. From the first year to the last year of implementation among Honolulu District contractors, there was a 100% reduction in Days Away, Restricted, or Job Transfer Rate; a 58% reduction in Accident Frequency Rate; and a 84% reduction in Total Case Incident Rate.

Troy Larson, Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Safety and Occupational Health Manager, and Jeremy McCranie, Safety & Occupational Health Manager for the Honolulu District, pose for a photo during a ceremony to present the prestigious Army Safety and Occupational Health Star Award to the Honolulu District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Fort Shafter June 28, 2024. USACE PHOTO BY CORTLAND HENDERSON
Troy Larson, Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Safety and Occupational Health Manager, and Jeremy McCranie, Safety & Occupational Health Manager for the Honolulu District, pose for a photo during a ceremony to present the prestigious Army Safety and Occupational Health Star Award to the Honolulu District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Fort Shafter June 28, 2024. USACE PHOTO BY CORTLAND HENDERSON

The Corps of Engineers Safety and Occupational Health Management System (CE-SOHMS) is a methodology that fully integrates safety and occupational health functions into all USACE business operations, to ensure risk is managed properly at the correct level resulting in reduced injuries and illnesses of employees and contractors, while enhancing USACE ability to complete the mission on-time, within budget, and at a quality expected by customers.

“At the end of the day, safety is all about taking care of people,” said Jeremy McCranie, Safety & Occupational Health Manager for the Honolulu District. “Where are we going from here – establishing a better work-life balance and being the happiest workplace in the Pacific.”